Posted: February 16th, 2023

Discuss the inherited mutation genes BRCA and BRCA 2, their prevalence, risks for different cancers, and recommended surveillance screenings for those with a confirmed genetically inherited mutation.

BRCA1 and BRCA2 are two inherited mutations genes that have been studied by scientists for decades and are known to increase the risk of developing certain cancers. These two genes, short for “breast cancer susceptibility gene 1” and “breast cancer susceptibility gene 2”, when mutated can lead to a significantly increased chance of developing breast, ovarian, prostate and other types of cancer.

The prevalence rate is generally higher in certain ethnic groups; for example, one study found that Ashkenazi Jewish women have a much higher lifetime risk compared to non-Jewish women. BRCA1 was discovered first in 1994 with an incidence rate ranging from 0.12% to 0.18%. The prevalence of BRCA2 is estimated at between 0.006% -0.03%. It is important to note that while these mutations occur more often in certain populations there is still the potential for it to be found amongst any population group regardless of ethnicity or country of origin.

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In addition to having an increased risk factor for breast cancer, those who carry either mutation also have a higher chance of getting ovarian cancer as well as male breast cancer (though this occurs less frequently). Furthermore, people with BRCA1 may also be at risk for cervical or pancreatic cancers whereas those carrying the BRCA2 mutation may face an increased likelihood of stomach or gallbladder cancers. Generally speaking both mutations can cause similar risks but each person must be assessed individually on the implications their particular circumstances might pose in terms of additional health concerns such as familial history/genetic heritage.

Discuss the inherited mutation genes BRCA and BRCA 2, their prevalence, risks for different cancers, and recommended surveillance screenings for those with a confirmed genetically inherited mutation.

Given all this information it is not surprising why having regular screenings after being tested positive for one or both mutations is strongly recommended; these include mammograms every year starting from age 40 along with abdominal ultrasounds every six months starting at age 25 (or five years before onset if applicable). For men specifically they should consider undergoing MRI scans annually beginning at 45 years old plus digital rectal exams starting around the same age range; however due care should always be taken depending on individual testing results so make sure you consult your doctor prior engaging in any screening program related activities!
My thoughts on genetic testing depend largely upon how confident I am about my personal family history and whether I believe there could potentially be any issues which such tests would uncover – if yes then absolutely go ahead but otherwise it’s up to each individual determine what they want/need based upon their own unique situation & lifestyle choices etc.. In addition when deciding whether or not get tested we must also consider ethical implications including privacy concerns surrounding our data – even though protection measures exist nowadays it doesn’t hurt double-check before making a final decision! Ultimately though no matter what path we take knowing our genetics helps us gain better insight into ourselves which ultimately will help us live healthier lives overall 🙂

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